WWDC 2017 Keynote – My Raw Notes

I had the idea to do my yearly write up of all the things I saw watching the WWDC keynote.. instead this year, I thought it would be cool to just post my raw notes.. see how I am thinking while watching the keynote.. Let me know what you think:
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WWDC 2017 – Keynote Notes
Cool shot of the mixer showing all the speakers to come
Why do all camera guys look the same, black pants, t-shirt, frumpy hair?
Silent mode announcement at 1:03pm
Crowds are all waving at what appears to be drone video flying around the inside of the auditorium.
Ok 1:05pm starting to play music with lyrics must be the key for everyone to sit down

Start time 1:08PM

Funny video on unplugging the App Store…

16M registered developers, 5300 in the room

Platforms tvOS, WatchOS, macOS, iOS

No updates – too much to talk about, other than apple is doing great
6 announcements –

    1. tvOS – 50 partners, Amazon is coming to Apple TV
    2. watchOS – Kevin Lynch –
      1. Watch faces –
        1. Siri powered watch face, what you need by dynamic time of day. (Including 3rd party apps)
        2. Kalido scope face
        3. Toy story faces
      2. Activities
        1. More personalized smarter coaching and monthly challenges
        2. Workout app – new UI, Pool swim will auto sense the sets that you are doing, and pace and stroke type. High intensity interval training too. Multiple workouts in a row to add multiple things, like swim, bike, etc. In door at the gym enabling two way data exchange with GYM equipment using NFC connection.
      3. Music
          Redesigning music app – auto sync to the watch – new music and mixes, so that you can listen.
      4. Demo
        1. Vertical scroll thru the dock
        2. New news app on Apple Watch.
        3. Play list auto starts with workout, swipe left to control music.
      5. Flashlight and safety light in control center
      6. Apps running the background increased… and native core bluetooth on the watch. (Dexcom sensor for real time glucose monitoring, swim monitors, etc.). Upgrade across ALL watches in the fall.
    3. macOS – the heart and sole of Apple. High Sierra
      1. 1. Safari update – faster
        1. 1. Autoplay blocking!!!! YEAH!!
        2. 2. Faster Java
        3. Privacy – Intelligent tracking prevention… identify trackers, segregate cross site scripting ads
      2. Mail –
        1. Search improvements using spotlight to do top hits
        2. Split view in full screen to do mail compose
        3. 35% less disk space usage
      3. Photos
        1. All imports in chronological order
        2. Face improvements and synced across your devices
        3. Editing enhancements: curves, selective color, punch out to other tool sync back to your photo library like Pixelmater or photoshop
        4. Printed books added to third parities are now opened up
      4. File system updates: (HFS is 30 years old)
        1. APFS is coming to macOS as new default.
      5. Video: h264 current standard
        1. 1. New standards h265 40% better compression
        2. Metal 2. Another 10x improvements
          1. Using metal 2 for machine learning
          2. Metal for external graphics – so you can add an external graphics card from your Mac
        3. Pro content creation
          1. Metal for VR to high-sierra
          2. Final cut will allow you to edit spherical video
          3. Multiple VR platforms to Mac
      6. all systems that are 2010 and newer
    4. Hardware MAC
      1. New iMacs
        1. Upto 64 GB storage
        2. Fusion on all 27inch
        3. 2TB SSD on 27 inch
        4. 2 USB-C adapter
        5. Graphics –
          1. Adding discrete graphics on all 4k graphics
          2. Using Raedon with 3X performance
          3. ILM demo of new iMac. Showed Unreal editor in VR, WOW…
          4. 90 frames per second rendering on an iMac
        6. Starting at $1799 for 5k 27inch
      2. New MacBook Pro updates
        1. Going to Kabyt Lake
        2. Faster SSDs to Mabbooks
        3. Better graphics to MacBook Pro base
        4. Lowered
      3. End of the year target at the new upgradable MacPro (built kinda like. iMac)
        1. Thicker… called the iMac Pro
        2. CPU – 8 Core – Xeon processor
        3. CPU – and a 10 core Xeon processor
        4. Up to 18 core Xeon Processor
        5. Radeon Vega Graphics architecture – up to 16 GB VRAM ( 11 Teraflops single precision)
        6. 128GB ECC Memory
        7. 4TB of 3GB/secon SSD
        8. 4 TB3, 10GB ethernet
        9. Drives up to 44 Million Pixels
        10. Starts at $4999 (kinda pricey) available in Dec.
    5. 5. iOS – 86% of devices are on iOS 10, vs. Android 7 – 7% adoption
      1. Messages –
        1. Redesigned app drawer
        2. Messages in iCloud – all conversations will be synchronized
      2. ApplePay
        1. Person to person payments – send and receive money
        2. Also available on Apple Watch
      3. Siri –
        1. 21 languages – available more than any assistant
        2. Improved the voice using deep learning
        3. Added translation (very cool)
        4. English, Chinese, French German and Italian
      4. Improvements to Siri Kit
        1. Task management
        2. Better predictive technologies
        3. Using on device learning, and some auto responses
        4. Learning gets synced across all your devices, readable only by you and your devices.
      5. Camera improvements using HVEC – less storage, better compression and replacing JPEG with HEIF (new compression)
        1. Low light photographs and stabilization, exposing depth api to developers.
      6. Photos Apps
        1. Better Machine learning to improve the process for Memories
      7. Demo
      8. Control center redesign
        1. Added 3D Touch for more features
        2. All fits on one screen now
        3. Unification of the notifications
        4. Long exposure option in photos… very cool
        5. Apple Pay accessible in messages
      9. Maps
        1. Detailed floor plans of Malls, place cards, directories, and by floor adding 100s each month
        2. Same for Airports
        3. Speed limit and lane guidance
        4. Bring Car Play capabilities too – called do not disturb while driving.
      10. Homekit
        1. Airplay 2 protocol.. multi-room audio in iOS
        2. Apple TV and third party api for audio
      11. Apple Music
        1. Added your friend’s music
        2. With profiles, etc.
        3. Developer API for music now
      12. App Store Updates
        1. 500 million weekly visitors to App Store. 180 Billion apps downloaded to date.
        2. Phased releases you can decided how to rollout over time
        3. Brand new design to App Store
        4. New Today view
        5. New Games View
        6. New in app purchases can be featured
        7. Live demo
      13. Metal 2 and HVEC coming to iOS
        1. Machine learning –
          1. New APIs –
            1. Vision API – face tracking / landmarks
            2. NLP – Tokenization and named entity recognition
        2. Augmented Reality –
          1. AR Kit — demo.. Very very cool
          2. Fast and stable motion tracking / plane identification / ambient light rendering and scale identification
          3. Wingnut AR – demo of new app. Using unreal engine 4.
        3. QR support from lock screen
    6. iPad – time to talk about iPad Pro
      1. Currently two models 12.9 and 9.7, New iPad Pro – 10.5 inch display
        1. Japanese JIS keyboard
        2. 120 hz refresh . Dynamically adjust reset rate based on content, allows improved battery life
        3. 20ms latency for Apple Pencil
        4. A10X – 6-core CPU and 12-Core GPU, 40% faster graphics performance
      2. Finally iOS for iPad updates!!
        1. More items in the dock
        2. Multitasking and drag an app from the doc
        3. App switcher with DRAG AND DROP!!
        4. Keyboard flicking to get to 2ndary things
        5. New App – FILES….
          1. Get access to the file system on iPad
          2. Including third party storage options

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And then life took over and I missed the rest of the keynote.

IPhone Updates, Downloads, and Monday Mornings

Ok, I didn’t start this process on a Monday morning, but there was an “emergency” update by apple on Thursday that seemed to hose my iPhone.  The update was 9.3.1 and was to address a problem some people were having when they tried to click on links in emails.  To be honest, I rarely try to do this so I didn’t appear to be impacted by the people. However, as a developer, I tend to update my devices as soon as the updates are released.  

I recently turned off Apple Music and went back to just using iTunes Match.  With a library of about 18,000 songs, I was not getting much value out of Apple Music.  In order to allow me to have access to all my music when traveling, I had started to download one of my playlists (it’s called unplayed and unbanked – which allows me to listen to a ton of music I haven’t listened to in about 3 year or more).  This is when all my problems began.  My iPhone was having issues downloading the 8,000+ songs, and kept hanging.  After it hung, the phone would get very hot and burn thru the battery.  I tried canceling the downloads, and they would magically start back up!  It also was stopping me from being able to download new apps.  It seemed that no matter what I did (restart phone, hard restart of phone, you name it), the phone would just hang on downloads and burn thru the battery.

I decided yesterday that I had enough, and did a factory reset on the phone!  Then more troubles!  My latest backup was causing the same problems, so I went back in time and chose a backup from before the 9.3.1 update.  The restore ran over night, but sometime during the night, it stopped.  And this morning I’ve had to start reinstalling all my apps (one at a time).  At least now the phone seems to be installing apps again.  Wish me luck!

In the mean time, I found a bug in WastedTime 6.0 and submitted a fix to my App to version 6.1.  Hope Apple releases it soon!

Oh – and Happy Monday!

IPhone Updates, Downloads, and Monday Mornings

Ok, I didn’t start this process on a Monday morning, but there was an “emergency” update by apple on Thursday that seemed to hose my iPhone.  The update was 9.3.1 and was to address a problem some people were having when they tried to click on links in emails.  To be honest, I rarely try to do this so I didn’t appear to be impacted by the people. However, as a developer, I tend to update my devices as soon as the updates are released.  

I recently turned off Apple Music and went back to just using iTunes Match.  With a library of about 18,000 songs, I was not getting much value out of Apple Music.  In order to allow me to have access to all my music when traveling, I had started to download one of my playlists (it’s called unplayed and unbanked – which allows me to listen to a ton of music I haven’t listened to in about 3 year or more).  This is when all my problems began.  My iPhone was having issues downloading the 8,000+ songs, and kept hanging.  After it hung, the phone would get very hot and burn thru the battery.  I tried canceling the downloads, and they would magically start back up!  It also was stopping me from being able to download new apps.  It seemed that no matter what I did (restart phone, hard restart of phone, you name it), the phone would just hang on downloads and burn thru the battery.

I decided yesterday that I had enough, and did a factory reset on the phone!  Then more troubles!  My latest backup was causing the same problems, so I went back in time and chose a backup from before the 9.3.1 update.  The restore ran over night, but sometime during the night, it stopped.  And this morning I’ve had to start reinstalling all my apps (one at a time).  At least now the phone seems to be installing apps again.  Wish me luck!

In the mean time, I found a bug in WastedTime 6.0 and submitted a fix to my App to version 6.1.  Hope Apple releases it soon!

Oh – and Happy Monday!

Review – Home Inventory for Mac and iOS

According to the makers of Home Inventory (Binary Formations, LLC. ), September was “National Preparedness Month” and as such they made their flagship product “Home Inventory” available for 50% off.  I got the opporuntity to do a review of the Mac product, along with both iOS companion products – Mobile Backup and Photo Remote.  Binary Formations was founded a little over four years ago, but the product shows a level of maturity of feature set, that comes from building a product that is truly needed by the developers themselves.  The Mac App has a PDF user manual that is over 150 pages, and I admit I had to go to refer to it a few times to understand how to access some of the features – but more on that later.

What is Home Inventory?  Well it’s name describes it perfectly, it is an inventory that any home owner should have, for insurance purposes, of the items in their home.  Most insurance policies require some sort of inventory in order to reimburse after a disaster, and Home Inventory puts the tools in your hands to make sure you have what you need.  Given the completeness of this application, I won’t be able to cover all aspects of the program, and will instead focus on data capture.

I have been meaning to do a home inventory for insurance purposes for some time, but I never really have had the time to do so.  Writing a review of the app is a perfect opportunity to give it shot. Being a realist, however, I knew I would never be able to do a full inventory in time to make a meaningful review, so I decided to do a much smaller inventory, i.e. the things on my desk in my home office.  This still became a bit of a daunting task.  Should I do everything, or only those things which are relevant and expensive.  I again took the shorter path.  I would only do electronics gadgets, and there are plenty of those!! My plan was to enter 10 items, and see how it goes.

First I needed to install the Mac App, not a problem as it is available on the AppStore, so a quick click got it going.  I created the initial data file during the launch, and was presented with a screen to define some basic home information, including a picture of the home, a Maintenance Schedule and Assessment History.  You can also include detailed information about when the house was built, the lot size, age of the home, and purchase price.  This level of information is great for an insurance assessment, probably not so much for a review on the web.  So I have blocked out most of that information and included a random house picture for this review.

The First thing I entered was using the Photo Remote to take a picture of the DockIT Air case I reviewed recently (see that post).  The iPhone App requires that you are on the same wifi as the Mac running the software, that the Mac version of the application be running, and that you select the Menu options Inventory -> Photo Remote, or press Command-R.  You are walked thru either scanning a Barcode (which I did with another item) or taking a picture.  If you scan the barcode it will do a look up on Amazon (or perhaps other services) and pre-fill in much of the information about the object.  You are then walked through a series of items to select the location, make, model, serial number, price, etc.  If you don’t hit “save” you will lose the data you have entered.  Also, if you close the window on the Mac the connection will be broken and you will lose your information.  You cannot add all the information on the Remote Photo app, and will find yourself going back to your Mac to complete the process.  The good news is, that while some of the views have visual prompts to accept new value (for example – a Click to add receipt button), drag and drop seems to be working fine.

The following pictures show you how the iPhone App works, and include a few screen shots of the Mac App.

1) Define Inventory File

1) Define Inventory File

2) Define your home info

2) Define your home info

3) Add Picture and Address

3) Add Picture and Address

4) Add Assessment History and Maintenance

4) Add Assessment History and Maintenance

After getting your basics setup, the following screens show how I added a item via my iPhone using the Photo Remote app.

1) Connecting to Mac

1) Connecting to Mac

2) Choose how to add

2) Choose how to add

3) Add a Photo

3) Add a Photo

4) Add a Value

4) Add a Value

Given the goal of this application to make sure you are prepared in case of a catastrophic event, I like that they support storing the data on DropBox and for those who are a bit more worried about privacy and security (you will, after all want to include all of your policy and assessment data in the program), you can do a manual backup to your iPhone via wifi.  Having multiple ways and locations where you can store the data is critical for ensuring that your inventory is safe in case of an emergency.

Overall, this is a very complete, if somewhat complex, program.  I do not knock the complexity at this time, as the objective is to truly be ready for a complete inventory of your assets for an emergency, and that is a complex goal.  The program includes the ability to print many different reports, including a move report – which I thought was a great use of all the data you collect.  I hope that overtime they continue to simplify the interface and make it much more iOS and Mac like in its interface.  A single example of how this would work would be to allow the Photo Remote to be able to capture the pictures and basic information without having to connect to the mac.  Right now if you exit the app on the phone, before a “save” action, you lose the data you’ve been entering on that item to that point. iOS apps should be able to handle a loss of network communication without losing data.

I can’t say I am looking forward to completion of my Home Inventory, but I am certainly glad that this tool exists to ensure that I have captured all the things  I need to be prepared should I ever need it.

Continuing to explore CoreData

A few weeks back I was at MacWorld where I talked to the people at APRESS to see what books they may have on CoreData. They had one that seemed to be pretty good and I have picked it up. The book is called Pro Core Data for iOS: Data Access and Persistence Engine for iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch by MIchael Privat and Robert Wamer. While the book only covers thru iOS4, I figure it may have a better structure and approach for understanding the basics of CoreData.

I plan on spending time over the next few months going thru this book…and will provide some feedback here on what I think of it, and if it helps me get passed my mental block on CoreData.

Day two of MacWorld/iWorld 2014

IMG_1987

The Crowd waiting to get in


Wow.. what a busy day, and yes, I picked up a toy today. The Bass Egg was a kickstarted last year, and after hearing it today and doing a few tests (like placing it on my head), I was amazed and had to buy it. I am listening to a podcast on it right now, and this is the best sound I’ve had on my iPhone. Here’s the setup I am using in the hotel.
The Bass Egg Speaker

The Bass Egg Speaker


I spent the day in sessions, almost non-stop. I tried to tweet out from a few of them. Check out my feed at @michaelrowe01.

The first session was way-way too short. Rich Mogull – CEO of Securosis. You should follow him on twitter at rmogull. I was looking forward to this, but with only 30 minutes for the session, I felt it was more of an overview about how Apple has a Philosophy that focuses on usability, over security, but they have done a really good job of addressing security by default. Also, given the closed nature of the platform, they have the opportunity to enforce some really good practices. He did show how his machine was setup, and there was only one setting that I had not setup the same way. That setting is, when traveling he changes the firewall to Block all incoming requests. (Guess I shouldn’t have mentioned that, and it is changed now.

The second session was a presentation by Robert Scoble & Shel Israel on their new book – The Age of Context. Today you can pick up the ebook version for Kindle for only $1.99. I picked it up and the hard copy book, since it was autographed. This was one of those talks that pump a whole bunch of exciting thoughts and ideas into 45 minutes. I’ve been talking about and thinking about many of these ideas due to my work in my day job around the Internet of Things. Scoble and Shel talked about how all the sensors we have around us are providing a ton of context to our daily lives. It also enables an unbelievable level of pinpoint marketing; however companies are failing to realize this. They also addressed the shift of the freaky line, the point where technology freaks us out. I will make a post after I read the book to describe this talk in more detail.

I skipped the next two sessions I had lined up, since I would not get lunch if I did, and instead I walked the show floor some more. I talked with the guys at Bass Egg, and told them I would probably be back to buy it tomorrow. I also talked to the designers of the everdock. This machined aluminum dock is great for charging two devices at once. What makes it unique is that they use your cables, and have a few rubber/silicon pieces that make it a perfect fit for a iPhone or iPad in a case. You can also use it for non-apple devices. I will probably pick one of these up tomorrow.

I also talked with the team over at extra-life.org. They sponsor the 24 hours of gaming in the fall, but they are promoting year round for people to build up teams to game for 24 hours. This is used to raise money for the Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals. What a great idea, play games to help kids. I recorded a few questions with the people in the booth, and that will be included in my weekly podcast over at GamesAtWork.Biz.

I then ran over to catch the session on the NSA and you. This was a panel discussion that wanted to have questions from the audience; however, once again it was too short. The panel was a great group of security exports, but with a panel of five people there were only 5 questions all from the panel moderator. While the questions were good, it didn’t give the panel much time to provide deep and meaningful answers. So what where the questions and who were the experts:

  • What is the biggest security thing in the last year? The revolution that the NSA has undermined crypto standards, the reach and scope of the data monitoring, the hoarding of zero day vulnerabilities (with no obvious fixes to our own infrastructure), and the legal interpretation of collection that the NSA uses.
  • Why should the average person care about mass surveillance and privacy?They do care, but they are not really cognizant of what is really happening with their data, given that most people are opting in voluntarily without understanding what the picture is that the data is providing would freak us out.
  • Can we trust Apple with our data? While their corporate culture may favor the user’s experience, you are ultimately at risk that an individual in a company could make a mistake and that violates your trust. Individuals should be responsible in what they do and how they segment their data, so while as individuals you can trust a person, you cannot apply that to an enterprise.
  • What can the average person do? This used to be a simple answer – encrypt everything, but now that the NSA has undermined some of the standards, you need to segment your data, encrypt it, and be very aware of what you do or do not share.
  • How do we put pressure on congress? Ultimately, you need to put pressure on congress and companies, money talks and unfortunately those with the most influence the most. So it may be easier to influence companies into pressuring congress. Having said that, Parker indicated that the USA Freedom Act is a good start, and sets a minimum approach in this space.

The experts:

I then got into another good session on using Logic Pro X – given the time constrains Andrea Pejrolo, PhD actually focused on some great new features that Logic Pro X has introduced around quantification, flex pitch, and the new virtual drummer. I learned tons from this, but was hoping to improve things around my editing workflow and that was not to be. I am going to; however, play a bit with flex pitch on a few projects I am working on. So definitely worth it.

More tomorrow!

Local Engineer’s cool Pen

A couple of months ago I was given a PressurePen by Chuck N, from the local Triangle Mac Users Group. The idea was to play with it and write up a blog entry. I had been running iOS7 most of the summer, and the app didn’t seem to work with iOS 7 on either my iPad or my iPhone. So It’s taken me a while to write up this post. Having said that, I’ve now had some fun playing with this pen, enabled via a Kickstarter.

Let’s begin with the device itself, it is a set of open source designs that allows you to print our a shell for a pressure pen. A pressure pen is used by artists to behave much more like a real pen or brush. Applications sense the amount of pressure being applied to the pen and translate that into things like the width of the stroke, the amount of “paint” being applied, and how fast the “paint” is used up from the brush. The goal is to make the process of creating digital art, more like traditional art.

I’ve tested the pen on three different devices and two different apps. Due to the iOS7 problems, Charles Mangin (the creator) suggested I test on my Android tablet (a Samsung Tab 2) with Infinite Painter app or if I wanted to test on iOS that I use an app called Pen & Paper. Both of these apps worked fine. My artistic skills are bad, so I won’t post any pictures of any of my “art”. If you want to use the Pressure Pen app on iOS7, it currently does not recognize the pressure off the pen. Charles does not have an iOS device, so there may be a delay on support. I have offered to test it for him, if there are others who would test, comment on this post and perhaps we can help Charles update this app.

So how does the PressurePen work? The pen is battery powered, so don’t forget to turn it on. The novel idea is the Pen plugs into your audio jack on your device and uses that to send the pressure levels to the tablet. Pretty simple. To that end I found the pressure to be a little less response than I expected, however, as I am not a digital artist, it may be that I’ve not yet trained myself to understand the limitations of this medium over pen and paper.

Overall, I think this is a very cool idea and I wish more apps supported this type of pressure pen. I find it would make a great addition to a photo manipulation application. What do you think? Go pick one up, it’s designs are open source and most of the parts a very inexpensive (there’s a kit available for $35 at the Pressure Pen website – http://pressurepen.net) or you can get a preassembled Pen for $65.

Core Data and iOS

I’ve been working on a new app lately, and I’ve taken this time to try and teach myself CoreData.  CoreData is the mechanism by which Apple has taken traditional SQL database and mapped it to the programming model used in iOS apps.  Over the next few blog entries I will try and describe my learning process, in the hope that it will help others pick up CoreData.  Also, I hope to start a dialog to help others, and myself, work thru any challenges which come up during this process.

If you are just starting, I find that Apple’s Core Data template app, is always a good way of understanding how it is all pulled together.  So let’s give that a shot by starting with a MasterDetail Application.  To do this, create a new Project and select Master Detail:

Master Detail

 

After you select that, fill in the next screen.  I have chosen to create a Universal Binary since I think you should always start from there, it exposes you to the ins and outs of MVC (Model View Controller).  Don’t forget to chose CoreData and Automatic Reference Counting.

After choosing the location for the project… give it a compile.  You should have a working CoreData application, that can render on either the iPad or iPhone simulator.

Master Detail Detail Screen

 

As you can see from the following screen shots both the iPad:

iPad Sample Core Data

and the iPhone:

iPhone Core Dataare working fine!

So what do we really have here? We have a simple app that if you click the plus will create a new record (date time stamp) and a detail screen that will show that time stamp.

Detail Screen

That’s pretty much it.

In the next post I will go a bit deeper on all the files that Apple created for you automatically when you chose this template.

Apple finishes update to Developer Portal

Last night, as I was checking my email before going to bed, I got a note from Apple that their replace/rebuild of the Developer portal had been completed and all services are working again.  Great news, and hopefully Apple has addressed, not only the security flaws identified by the Turkish researcher, but any fundamental design flaws which could expose other security issues going forward.

The biggest lessons I’ve learned from watching this all unfold is – security is hard.  Steve Gibson (from Spinrite fame) has been recording a long running podcast on security called “Security Now“.  He spends 2 hours, each week, going thru all the latest info on security patches, and describing the underlying design and technology of various protocols, etc. which shows how much you need to know to make truly secure applications.

Years ago, when I was working as a consultant, I wrote a Human Resources system for a home health care management company.  I was asked to make sure that we had an appropriate level of security and could segregate data between managed companies via passwords.  The design was simple.  Within the application, you had to enter a unique company identifier and password for each company’s data.  Simple and somewhat effective, given that the entire application and all of its data resided on a midrange computer that could only be accessed within the companies physical boundaries.  Within 1 month of the application going live, every monitor within the HR department had a nicely printed sticker listing the company identifier and the password for each.  So much for security.

The reason I bring this up is to identify how technology is only as secure as its weakest link.  Kevin Mitnick, shows us in his biography – Ghost in the Wires, that the best hacks are really around social engineering and not technology.  Even Mat Honan’s famous twitter / gmail / icloud hack, was much more a social engineering issue than a technology flaw.

If you are storing sensitive data (however you define sensitive), what are you doing to make your application secure, with out distracting from its functionality?

Security and will Monday see another iOS Beta?

Prior to the security issues on Apple’s site over a week ago, Apple had been on a bi-weekly cadence for iOS and OS X beta releases.  Last Monday, (July 22nd) the developer portal was down while Apple rebuilt the site to address the security issues no iOS beta was reported to be released.  With less than 24 hours to go, will they be in a position to release a beta tomorrow?  What is the impact to the overall release schedule of iOS?  What do you think?

I am hoping that the major progress we’ve seen in the last week on bringing the site back online (while still not complete, many of components are up as of this posting), has allowed Apple to focus back on working on iOS and Mavericks.  Perhaps there are some lessons in all of this for us, as developers, that security can’t be something we think about when we are done developing.  Security is something that needs to be built into our apps from the beginning.

One of my favorite podcasts is Security Now! with Steve Gibson of Gibson Research Company. A few months back, Steve talked about the effort he went thru to retrofit his entire website to https.  I think this is something that is worthwhile to consider for this site.  It is a lot of work , and exposed to him the inter-relationship of so much of our connected world.  At an app level, if you use any third party code, are you sure it is secure?  How do you go about testing for security?

The people who want to expose or exploit security issues in your code, spend much more time testing your application than perhaps you do.  They are not worried about shipping the next release.  They are methodical in how they test, probe, and attack your application.  Perhaps this is the time to start re-thinking your development and test strategy, so that security becomes a first class requirement for all that you do.